Daily Photo

Daily Photo

02 03 2020
Peak Sunrise

The pastels turn fiery as the Sun nears the horizon. The sunrise colors glance the bottoms of the clouds over a bog along a trail on the Alaska Dog Musher’s Association trail system. It’s the gorgeous light and sunrises like these that keep me going in the dark winter here.

CameraNikon NIKON D7100 (Current model NIKON D7500)
LensSigma 17-50mm F2.8 EX DC OS HSM for Nikon (For Canon cameras)
Focal Length27.0 mm
Aperturef/8
Exposure Time(1/6) (1/13) (1/3) Blended HDR
ISO400
01 03 2020
Snowy Aurora

For a solid week, the aurora danced across the sky almost every night under a bright moon in 2015. The contrast of the bright snowy forest and the lit-up sky was incredible. Usually, when the moon is bright it kind of drowns out the northern lights. Except on some of the most active nights. It seems like it’s been a while since we’ve had these all-night displays, definitely with any frequency. The Sun should be slowly coming out of solar minimum over the next few years, giving rise to more sunspots and solar activity that can cause the magnetospheric disturbances that help generate aurora.

CameraNikon NIKON D7000 (Current model NIKON D7500)
LensTokina AT-X 116 PRO DX (AF 11-16mm f/2.8) Nikon MountCanon Mount
Focal Length14.0 mm (21.0 mm in 35mm)
Aperturef/2.8
Exposure Time2.5s (2.5)
ISO1600
29 02 2020
Dall Sheep

Dall sheep grazing near Polychrome Pass in Denali National Park & Preserve. I took this photo while on a 3-day bike-packing trip in early May before the buses started running on the road. It felt like we had the park to ourselves, except for the sheep, grizzly, and ptarmigan.

CameraNikon NIKON D7100 (Current model NIKON D7500)
LensNikon 200-500mm f/5.6E ED AF-S VR
Focal Length500.0 mm (750.0 mm in 35mm)
Aperturef/5.6
Exposure Time0.002s (1/500)
ISO640
28 02 2020
Autumn in Denali National Park
Red and yellow fall colors on a mountain in Denali National Park

Mountains south of the Park Road in Denali National Park and Preserve. “Rivers” of yellow wind through the red foliage and “lakes” of green spruce dot the hillsides. I have yet to find a place that I would prefer to be in autumn, even though the season here is incredibly short. The splendid colors only hang around for about a week before the deciduous leaves fall, followed soon by the snow.


Get my 2023 Alaska Wall Calendar or Aurora Calendar here!  
 
CameraNikon NIKON D7000
LensAF-S DX VR Zoom-Nikkor 18-105mm f/3.5-5.6G ED
Focal Length58.0 mm (87.0 mm in 35mm)
Aperturef/5
Exposure Time0.00313s (1/320)
ISO320
27 02 2020
Cascades and Glacier

Surreal is the word I would use to describe the Harding Icefield Trail near Seward. I haven’t spent much time exploring Kenai Fjords National Park. Yet. But, I’m sure I’ll spend more time there soon. This photo overlooks a number of small cascades flowing under snowpack toward Exit Glacier. Drenched for 8 hours in the rain on this hike, I managed to get water damage in my camera when something shorted in the LCD screen. I remember smiling quite a bit despite the weather. I recently wrote a guide with maps and more photos to hiking this trail and others in the area. Check it out at the link below!

CameraNikon NIKON D7100 (Current model NIKON D7500)
LensSigma 17-50mm F2.8 EX DC OS HSM for Nikon (For Canon cameras)
Focal Length18.0 mm (27.0 mm in 35mm)
Aperturef/4
Exposure Time0.001s (1/1000)
ISO320
26 02 2020
Moose

Before living in Fairbanks, I’ve only seen three moose. The first was through the trees while hiking in New Hampshire. The second was dead in that back of a DOT truck, also in New Hampshire. The third was far away in a field in Minnesota. Since moving here almost 10 years ago I occasionally say things like, “I don’t think I’ve seen a moose in a couple of weeks.” They’re all over Alaska. It’s estimated there are between 175,000 and 200,000 throughout the state. When living in a dry cabin, I would occasionally have to wait until the moose left the yard to go to the outhouse.


You can help support me and this website!

 
Support on Patreon
 
Subscribe to Newsletter

The moose here are enormous and powerful! The Alaska-Yukon subspecies are nicknamed giant moose and can weigh over 1400 lbs (635 kg). At the shoulder, a bull moose can stand nearly 6.9 ft (2.1 m) tall and have antlers over 60 inches (1.5 m) across!

This female wasn’t much smaller. She was close to 6 ft tall at the shoulder. I didn’t go measure, though. I spotted here along Chena Hot Springs Road while driving out to Angel Rocks to go hiking. After spending about 5 minutes watching her eat willows along the road another driver pulled up beside her and scared her away. For as big as these animals are, it’s spooky how quickly they disappear after ducking into the woods.

CameraNikon NIKON D7000 (Current model NIKON D7500)
LensSigma 70-300mm F4-5.6 APO DG Macro HSM
Focal Length300.0 mm (450.0 mm in 35mm)
Aperturef/5.6
Exposure Time0.00063s (1/1600)
ISO400
25 02 2020
The View from US Creek Road

One of my favorite hiking areas near Fairbanks is barely known to people outside. It’s not riddled with majestic peaks or glaciers, rarely do I spot bears, there are only a couple roads that pass by the outskirts, and not much for food or tourist activities. To really see the area, you need to hike, ski, bike, ATV, snowmachine, or dogsled, or boat. This is the White Mountains National Recreation Area. Mostly composed of rolling hills dotted with a few tors and peaks of limestone or granite and some smaller creeks or rivers.

This photo was taken along US Creek Road off the Steese Highway, providing access to Nome Creek, Ophir Creek, and Beaver Creek National Wild River. I often compare it to the better known White Mountain National Forest in New Hampshire. The two areas are roughly the same size, except Alaska’s version has no roads going through it, no tourist traps, and far, far fewer people. In winter, there are 250 miles of groomed ski trails and public use cabins. It’s gorgeous country to get away in.

I’ll soon be writing some hiking guides to some of these locations. I’m compiling an online guide to hiking and travel in the state of Alaska. As of this writing, I have 6.5 guides posted, 25 in draft, and about 50 planned. I hope to have most of these up by summer. I have some exciting plans to make browsing by location, type of activity, and difficulty once some more content is up. Please check out the page and let me know what you think!

CameraNikon NIKON D7000 (Current model NIKON D7500)
LensAF-S DX VR Zoom-Nikkor 18-105mm f/3.5-5.6G ED
Focal Length18.0 mm (27.0 mm in 35mm)
Aperturef/5.6
Exposure Time0.0025s (1/400)
ISO400
24 02 2020
Corona

The aurora borealis, otherwise known as the northern lights in the northern hemisphere, are the biggest draws for tourists in the winter here in Fairbanks. It’s understandable. Seeing the sky light up in a naturally produced “fireworks” show isn’t witnessed by much of the world. Even when I lived in Minnesota, I never saw the aurora take the forms we see almost nightly here. This photo is an example of a corona, a phenomenon that occurs when the aurora is directly overhead. You get diverging rays of light from a point above.

I haven’t spent much time photographing the aurora in the last few years. I’ll still go out and watch, but don’t habitually set up the cameras and tripods anymore. I’m not sure why. I used to almost every night in winter and spring. I used to love making time-lapses like the one below. My interest is peaking again. Of course, right in the middle of solar minimum. Last night was bust. I set up equipment, but the aurora never materialized. Hopefully, I’ll have some luck before the midnight sun takes over.

I took this featured photo during a three-day, two-night slog up the Granite Tors trail near Fairbanks. For two days, I waded through waist-deep sugar snow with absolutely no help from my snowshoes. Pulling a sled with 15 lbs. of extra camera equipment. It was so much fun; I can’t wait to do it again! And I have no clue if that statement was sarcasm or not. Check out the story below!

Aurora Time-lapse – Fairbanks, Alaska

CameraNikon NIKON D7100 (Current model NIKON D7500)
LensTokina AT-X 116 PRO DX (AF 11-16mm f/2.8) Nikon MountCanon Mount
Focal Length11.0 mm (16.0 mm in 35mm)
Aperturef/2.8
Exposure Time1.3s (1.3)
ISO2500
23 02 2020
Velvet Free

Caribou are the fourth largest mammal in Denali National Park, after moose and bears (brown and black). You can usually spot them out on the tundra in small herds. Unlike the famous Porcupine caribou that migrates over 1500 miles per year (2400 km), the Denali herd stays almost entirely within the park boundary. However, there are exceptions, like when the herd left the park after a snowstorm to travel 140 miles, just northeast of Fairbanks [Population Dynamics of the Denali Caribou Herd]. The Denali herd doesn’t tend to congregate in large numbers, either. I’ve personally seen herds of about 30 in the park, but never larger. Most often, I will see between two and ten in a given area.

Caribou typically shed their antlers in mid-winter. In this photo (early fall), the caribou’s antlers are bony, but when they are growing in the spring and summer, they are covered in a fleshy velvet. These cycles and others related to caribou have been used by Inuit to name months of the year. For the Igloolik Inuit in Canada, amiraijaut means “when velvet falls off caribou antlers”, and marks that time in the year in early fall (late August, early September) [Tuktu-Caribou].

CameraNikon NIKON D7100 (Current model NIKON D7500)
LensNikon 200-500mm f/5.6E ED AF-S VR
Focal Length200.0 mm (300.0 mm in 35mm)
Aperturef/5.6
Exposure Time0.002s (1/500)
ISO250
22 02 2020
Iceberg
A lone iceberg in Prince William Sound near Glacier Island and the Columbia Glacier.

A lone iceberg in Prince William Sound near Glacier Island and the Columbia Glacier. For the entire day, we had blue sky and Sun. Except here. This little spot at Glacier Island was completely inundated in fog and clouds. It was probably about four square miles of fog. We came across just a few icebergs adrift in the sound, but the ice-flow in Columbia Bay was incredible (photo below).

CameraNikon NIKON D7100 (Current model NIKON D7500)
LensSigma 17-50mm F2.8 EX DC OS HSM for Nikon (For Canon cameras)
Focal Length17.0 mm (25.0 mm in 35mm)
Aperturef/7.1
Exposure Time0.001s (1/1000)
ISO200
Iceflow in Columbia Bay in front of Columbia Glacier
The ice-flow in Columbia Bay in front of Columbia Glacier. The bay turned into a Slushy.
21 02 2020
Planetary Twilight
Jupter and Venus shining over a stand of trees on snow-covered Murphy Dome in Fairbanks, Alaska
Jupiter and Venus shining brightly in the sky

Back in 2012, a friend and I went out on Murphy Dome at night on skis. The temperature was -30 °F/-34 °C. For years since, I’ve told myself that 20-below was my cut-off for venturing off into the woods. Especially in the dark. I still do it, but at least I remember that I keep telling myself this. On this evening in early March, we spent hours photographing trees, rock outcroppings, and the gorgeous sky during blue hour. I dug a snow-pit to stay out of the wind while waiting for aurora.

Before the stars came out, two beacons, Jupiter and Venus, shined brightly to the west. I had some vague awareness that the conjunction was happening, but had gone out to watch for aurora. As it turns out, this ended up being my favorite photo from this evening. The northern lights didn’t materialize much, and I got some mild frostbite on my toes and fingers after about 3 hours in the cold wind.

The next Venus-Jupiter conjunction will occur on February 11, 2021.

CameraNikon NIKON D7000 (Current model NIKON D7500)
LensTokina AT-X 116 PRO DX (AF 11-16mm f/2.8) Nikon MountCanon Mount
Focal Length11.0 mm (16.0 mm in 35mm)
Aperturef/2.8
Exposure Time2s (2)
ISO640
20 02 2020
Motionless
Snow covered spruce trees
Snow-clad trees in Fairbanks, Alaska

There’s something insanely spooky about walking through the boreal forests here in the winter. All the hunched over ghosts of snow-covered, stunted spruce trees are motionless rising out of the white sea. And the air is so still. So little wind. It’s quiet. All you can hear is the crunching of the snow under your feet. The crunching is amplified by the quiet and the cold, cold air. A perfect place to get lost in thoughts.

CameraNikon NIKON D7000 (Current model NIKON D7500)
LensSigma 17-50mm F2.8 EX DC OS HSM for Nikon (For Canon cameras)
Focal Length17.0 mm (25.0 mm in 35mm)
Aperturef/3.5
Exposure Time0.01s (1/100)
19 02 2020
Twilight Aurora
Aurora in Twilight

Watching the northern lights before it’s dark is one of the most amazing experiences. The cobalt blue sky is already striking. The emerald and mint colors streaking across the sky will take your breath away. This display was from way back in 2012. I remember when this started I could barely even see any stars yet, but the sky was shimmering. It took some time to convince myself I was seeing the aurora, but it became obvious after the sky darkened a bit more. I’ve attached a few more photos below.

As a not totally unrelated side-note, I’m posting lots of old photos because I’m re-organizing the layout on my photography website. I keep finding photos that I never thought twice about at the time, but absolutely love and want prints of now. Turns out I take a lot of photos. Nearly 3 terabytes worth. Which reminds me, it’s time for a back-up. I’ll post when this update is done!

CameraNikon NIKON D7000 (Current model NIKON D7500)
LensTokina AT-X 116 PRO DX (AF 11-16mm f/2.8) (For Nikon and For Canon)
Focal Length11.0 mm (16.0 mm in 35mm)
Aperturef/2.8
Exposure Time6s (6)
ISO1250
aurora borealis in twilight over a forest
The first photo I took on this evening, the stars barely visible | Buy Print
Northern Lights over silhouetted forest
The sky grows darker, the aurora brighter | Buy Print
Aurora borealis over the Goldstream Valley in Fairbanks, Alaska
This is one of my most popular aurora photos. I drove out to Murphy Dome on this evening, but the sky erupted when I drove through the Goldstream Valley, so I had to stop and gawk. | Buy Print
18 02 2020
Ballaine Reflection
Ballaine Lake in Fairbanks, Alaska

It has been a cold winter in Fairbanks this year. We haven’t had one in a few years. While I’m writing this, our outdoor thermometer is reading +30 °F! Our home is in the hills, though, and there’s a temperature inversion. The airport temp (15-minute drive) is +11 °F. We just exited a second cold snap that had us in weeks of -20 °F to -40°F for days. The earlier spell lasted a few weeks and was a bit colder.

I’m rambling. None of this has anything to do with Ballaine Lake except that while I sit here writing, wrapped in a blanket, I’m looking at summer photos. Like this one here, of Ballaine Lake. Located along Farmer’s Loop at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, it’s a sight I miss seeing on my daily commute. In the warm months, there are daily reflections of the beautiful spruce, boreal forest. Nightly too, since the Sun doesn’t set until well after midnight for much of the summer. In winter, it’s an access point for the cross-country ski trails on the University.

CameraNikon NIKON D7100 (Current model NIKON D7500)
Focal Length17.0 mm (25.0 mm in 35mm)
Aperturef/8
Exposure Time0.00625s (1/160)
ISO100
17 02 2020
Glacier Stream
Rock balancing on ice over a glacial stream on the Black Rapids Glacier in the Alaska Range
Balancing boulder over a stream on the Black Rapids Glacier

This photo was taken in June on the Black Rapids Glacier in the Alaska Range. We were camping at 4000 ft elevation right at the snow line. Water from these streams typically drains via moulins in the summer months. However, it was early enough in the season that there wasn’t any englacial drainage yet. So, hiking on the surface meant we had to cross a lot of streams. So much jumping.

Larger rocks like this one insulate the ice beneath as the ice around the boulder melts. Luckily for us, this one was located in the path of a waterway, and the pedestal divided the stream. It provided a perfect spot so step across and keep our feet dry.

It was a knee-pounding couple of weeks, hiking up to 18 miles a day. In the last couple of days, some moulins started draining providing places to walk around the bigger streams. Despite my knees and legs aching for a few weeks after this trip, I look forward to returning to this beautiful area. Hopefully this summer. Stay tuned!

Water and ice on glaciers are some of my most passionate subjects to photograph. Below is a video I put together of moulins draining supraglacial streams on the Black Rapids Glacier.

Square Lensrentals Logo
CameraNikon NIKON D7000 (Current model NIKON D7500)
LensSigma 17-50mm F2.8 EX DC OS HSM for Nikon (For Canon cameras)
Focal Length17.0 mm (25.0 mm in 35mm)
Aperturef/9
Exposure Time0.00313s (1/320)
ISO250
16 02 2020
Arctic Ground Squirrel
Arctic ground squirrel eating a plant in Denali National Park

The Arctic ground squirrel lives only in subarctic North America and eastern Asia. Spending 7 to 8 months of the year in hibernation, these little critter’s body temperature drops to below freezing (27 °F, -3 °C). Their metabolism drops to 2% of their normal rate. Yet, their organs survive, their blood doesn’t freeze, and their brains return to normal function when they wake. These outstanding characteristics have led scientists to study them for a number of things including organ protection, treatment of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases, and treatment of Alzheimer’s.

Arctic ground squirrels are one of my favorite animals to watch. They build underground colonies and dart in and out of their holes on hillsides. Sometimes they can be quite bold and curious around people and not very shy. I see them all over hills and ridgelines in Denali National Park. If you’re ever in the area, check out the alpine trail at Eielson Visitor Center, Savage River Loop, or the Healy Overlook Trail, these little guys are running all over the place!

CameraNikon NIKON D7100 (Current model NIKON D7500)
LensNikon 200-500mm f/5.6E ED AF-S VR
Focal Length500.0 mm (750.0 mm in 35mm)
Aperturef/5.6
Exposure Time0.002s (1/500)
ISO640
15 02 2020
Dall Ram
Dall Ram in Denali National Park
Dall Ram spotting me from behind some bushes

One afternoon I was camping at Riley Creek at the entrance to Denali National Park. I got to the park a half-day early before a planned trip to spend a few days in the park. Wanting to spot some wildlife before heading out on the bus the next day, I decided to try to hike up Mt. Margaret before dark. I walked out of the popular Savage River Loop, passing many people along the way. A gentlemen saw me with my cameras and stopped to chat. I asked him if he had seen any sheep (I see them fairly frequently in this valley). He said he saw no wildlife, but if I continue along the trail beyond the bridge, past the maintained trail, I will find a little waterfall. I thanked him for the information, despite being very familiar with the area and went on my way.

About one minute later, I spotted 9 Dall sheep on a hill. They were far away, just little white dots high up on Mt. Margaret. I headed out past the end of the trail and started my way up the steep, rocky side of Mt. Margaret. There’s not a trail, just a few open and rocky ridgelines to navigate to the high ridge. I’m watching the little white dots on the hill, not seeming to get any larger. Suddenly, this big guy walks out of the bushes a few yards in front of me.

Not knowing his intentions, I backed away slowly. Ducking around a large outcropping for a bit, he curiously walked around to keep me in his sight, so I backed down some more. Once I was far enough away that he no longer acknowledged my presence, I pulled out my long lens and took a few photos. Since he was pretty well blocking my path, I couldn’t make it up to the sheep, but at least I had a few wildlife shots I had hoped to get on this impromptu hike!

CameraNikon NIKON D7100 (Current model NIKON D7500)
LensNikon 200-500mm f/5.6E ED AF-S VR
Focal Length500.0 mm (750.0 mm in 35mm)
Aperturef/5.6
Exposure Time0.004s (1/250)
ISO400
14 02 2020
Aurora Overflow
Northern lights reflecting off of overflow on the Chena River
Aurora over the frozen Chena River

I took this photo along the Angel Rocks trail in the Chena River State Recreation Area. Here the aurora borealis is reflecting off of overflow on the Chena River. A friend and I snowshoed up the highpoint on the Angel Rocks to Chena Hot Springs trail in the dark to get better views. The clouds eventually overtook the sky, but we had nearly 4 hours of hiking under the northern lights.

Check out the rest of the gallery from this evening here!

CameraNikon NIKON D7100 (Current model NIKON D7500)
LensSigma 17-50mm F2.8 EX DC OS HSM for Nikon (For Canon cameras)
Focal Length17.0 mm (25.0 mm in 35mm)
Aperturef/2.8
Exposure Time15s (15)
ISO1600
13 02 2020
Tunnel Ice
Ice wall in a tunnel on the Gulkana Glacier in the Alaska Range
Side of an ice tunnel on the Gulkana Glacier

Looking up at the walls of an ice tunnel on the Gulkana Glacier. This was a chunk of “dead” ice, no longer attached to the main body of the glacier, so no longer having any accumulation zone. This once sub-glacial chamber formed by meltwater is now just a small arch. Small might not be the right word, it’s probably 25 feet tall 40 feet across. The ice itself is full of inclusions of rock, dirt, and lots of air bubbles. I’ve included some more photos below.

CameraNikon NIKON D7100 (Current model NIKON D7500)
LensSigma 17-50mm F2.8 EX DC OS HSM for Nikon (For Canon cameras)
Focal Length 17.0 mm (25.0 mm in 35mm)
Aperturef/7.1
Exposure Time 0.01667s (1/60)
ISO160
An ice tunnel on the Gulkana Glacier
Approaching the tunnel
A person inspecting the walls of a glacial ice tunnel
Cat inspecting the ice
12 02 2020
Meadows over Exit Glacier

This photo was taken on the Harding Icefield Trail at Kenai Fjords National Park. As you step out of the forest on the lower reaches of the trail the landscape opens up to flower-filled green alpine meadows. The contrast with the blue and white ice below is stunning. This is easily one of the most spectacular trails I’ve ever hiked.

CameraNikon NIKON D7100 (Current model NIKON D7500)
LensAF-S DX VR Zoom-Nikkor 18-105mm f/3.5-5.6G ED
Focal Length42.0 mm (63.0 mm in 35mm)
Aperturef/4.8
Exposure Time0.0025s (1/400)
ISO125
 
I'm also on Patreon